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Architectural Scavenger Hunt

STARTS: Thursday, 8/22 (8AM)
ENDS: Wednesday, 8/28 (MIDNIGHT)

ABOUT THE SCAVENGER HUNT:

Photos have been taken of 12 unique architectural features found in the Warehouse District - these will be the 12 clues in the contest! These clues will be released on our website & social media channels on 8/22/19 at 8 AM. Each time you discover one of the clues, snap a picture that replicates the photo (as best as you can). When all twelve are found, submit all twelve photos for a chance to win!

The Scavenger Hunt Has Closed - Thank you for Playing!

Congrats to our winners:

Individual: Wendy (Resident at the Perry-Payne building)
Team: Amy and Bryan (Residents at Riverbend Condos)


Architectural Photo Clues: ANSWERS & DESCRIPTIONS

<< DOWNLOAD PHOTO CLUES (PDF) >>

The Crittenden Building (1854) 1382 W. 9th Street   Considered a fine example of High Victorian commercial architecture. The stone hood molds over the windows and the masonry coursing at each floor is indicative of many buildings in the Warehouse District from this era.

The Crittenden Building (1854)
1382 W. 9th Street

Considered a fine example of High Victorian commercial architecture. The stone hood molds over the windows and the masonry coursing at each floor is indicative of many buildings in the Warehouse District from this era.

The Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen Building (1920)
820 Superior Ave.

The brick and limestone structure is designed in the Beaux-Arts style popular during the era of construction. Note the sculpted frieze above the main entrance and the restored frescoed ceiling in the lobby.

 

The Rockefeller Building (1903)
614 Superior Ave.

With the invention of the elevator and the growing use of curtain wall construction, this building became the tallest building in the Warehouse District at 17 stories. The first three floors feature an ornate cast-iron relief design in a motif that is repeated throughout the interior space on many details including railings, doorknobs, mail slots, and window pulls.

 

The Newman Building (1930)
1293 W. 9th Street

An alteration done in 1930 of a previous structure, the upper floors include a newer cornice and medallion. The “N” stands for the company that commissioned the work - the Newman Manufacturing Company dealt in toys, novelties, and party goods.

Mallorca @ Crittenden Building
1390 W 9th St

A really interesting security box that was a little hard to find!

 

The Perry-Payne Building (1888)
730 Superior Ave.

This building was built during a pivotal period of American architecture when engineering moved way from load-bearing masonry structures to a curtain wall where “skeletons” of iron columns supported the weight of the building and the facade was secured to the structure.

 

Lighthouse Steps (1830)
West 9th @ Main Ave.

This wall and steps are the remains of Cleveland’s original lighthouse built by (you guessed it) Levi Johnson! It was perched on the highest point of the city visible from far up the river, the canal, and also the lake. NOTE: Currently HWDDC is developing a pocket park to commemorate the lighthouse and provide an open green space to Warehouse District Residents that incorporates the wall and steps.

 

Gates to Worthington Yards Courtyard
800 Block St. Clair

A series of late 19th century commercial structures renovated into 90 units of housing around two courtyards is an excellent example of adaptive reuse - turning older structures into moderns offices & residences.

The Western Reserve Building (1891)
1468 West 9th St.

Designed by Burnham and Root, this was one of Cleveland’s earliest skyscrapers. Built in the Chicago Style, the structure employs brick load-bearing walls with wrought and cast-iron members. Tile arched construction is also used which can be seen in the lobby.

The L.F. & S. Burgess Grocers Building (1874)
1406 W. 6th Street

This building is part of the oldest intact commercial block in Downtown (from St. Claire to Frankfort Street) and a great example of Victorian Italianate commercial architecture with high arched windows and keystones, and a cast-iron cornice.

 

The Johnson Block (1851 - 1854)
1352 - 1400 W. 6th Street

This is a typical commercial building of the era. One of the few remaining stone-clad buildings in the District, it displays uniform facades, consistent cornice lines, and regularly spaced windows. The “stars” were added to the structural support beams as a decorative feature, typically seen in this era of construction.

 

Cornerstone of the Root McBride, Cobb, & Bradley Building (1884)
1220 West 6th Street

Cornerstones were special bricks at the base of buildings and how architects “signed” their work.


HOW TO PLAY:

  • Register as an individual or a team (2-4 people).

  • Locate the the 12 architectural features found in the provided image clues.

  • Take an ORIGINAL photo of that feature/building location.

  • Submit your photos to complete the contest by midnight Wednesday, 8/28.

  • STUCK? Hints will be provided at Warehouse Wednesday on 8/28, 11:30am - 1:00pm at the Worthington Yards Courtyard.


WINNERS & PRIZES:

  • All winners will be chosen at random from correct submissions.

  • Individuals: Submit correct photos for all 12 clues. Correct individual submissions will go into a drawing to win a $25 gift certificate to a Warehouse District establishment of the winner’s choice.

  • Teams: Submit correct photos for all 12 clues. Correct team submissions will go into a drawing to win a $100 gift certificate to a Warehouse District establishment of the winning team’s choice.

Any questions? Email Us